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Red-tailed black cockatoo

Calyptorhynchus banksii

Red-tailed black cockatoo

Red-tailed black cockatoos are common in parts of Australia but, in some parts of southern Australia, they are considered endangered.

Old gum trees that previously provided nesting hollows for the cockatoos are disappearing and are often used as firewood, resulting in a loss of habitat for the birds. The stringy tree bark which provides the cockatoos’ main food source is also disappearing.

Habitat
Forest

Diet - Herbivore/Insectivore
Red-tailed black cockatoos eat mostly seeds but also eat nuts, fruits, flowers, bulbs and insects.

Size
The average red-tailed black cockatoo is up to 63 centimetres long and can weigh up to 870 grams.

Location
Red-tailed black cockatoos are found in the open forests, woodlands and ravine forests of Australia.

Conservation status
The IUCN does not consider the red-tailed black cockatoo to be currently endangered. They are listed under Appendix II of CITES.

Threats
The principal threat to the red-tailed black cockatoo comes from the removal of the trees which supply their main diet and habitats.

Current population
There are no estimates for the global population of these cockatoos but there is evidence to show that their numbers have decreased. In south-east Australia, there are now less than 1,000 birds.

Zoo population
Red-tailed black cockatoos are managed under an ESB. There are more than 80 cockatoos living in zoos around the world.

Key to acronyms

IUCN - International Union for Conservation of Nature

CITES - Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

ESB - European Studbook

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